Wednesday, December 1

Last year’s global average temperature was the second highest ever, with clear continued climate change and WMO

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) announced on the 18th that the average global temperature in 2017 was the second highest in the history of observation. This is the second highest temperature ever recorded in 16 years, and the highest temperature for 15 to 3 consecutive years. NASA also released last year’s high-temperature data. The WMO warns that “it is a clear indication that climate change is continuing due to rising greenhouse gas concentrations.”

WMO has integrated and analyzed five observational data. As a result, it was found that the average temperature in 2017 was 14.8 degrees Celsius, 1.1 degrees Celsius higher than before the Industrial Revolution, and the same level as in 2015. In 2016, it rose by 1.2 degrees Celsius, which is the highest temperature record, but WMO pointed out that the phenomenon did not occur in 2017 as a result of being affected by the El Nino phenomenon, which has a strong value in the same year. “It was the warmest year without Ernino,” he said.

NASA also announced on the 18th that the average global temperature in 2017 was 0.9 degrees higher than the average from 1951 to 1980, based on its own observation data.

Regarding last year’s global high temperature data, WMO Executive Secretary Tarras pointed out that “long-term temperature trends are more important than the global average temperature rankings for individual years. Global temperatures are on the rise.” There is. The Paris Agreement, an international framework for preventing global warming, aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to virtually zero in the second half of this century and to limit temperature rises from before the Industrial Revolution to less than 2 degrees Celsius, preferably 1.5 degrees Celsius. The data released this time show that global warming has already progressed by more than half of the target.

Figure 1 Areas where the 2017 average global temperature is higher than the 1981-2010 average are shown in yellow and orange (provided by WMO).Figure 1 Areas where the 2017 average global temperature is higher than the 1981-2010 average are shown in yellow and orange (provided by WMO).
Figure 2 Areas where the average global temperature Figure 2 Areas where the average global temperature “2013-17” is higher than the “1951-80” average are shown in yellow or orange (provided by NASA).